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Skilled managers are in demand in an array of industries. Managers with the appropriate experience and credentials are some of the world's highest paid professionals.

The three basic management levels include top-level manager, middle manager and lower manager. People seeking a management careers need skills such as leadership, communication, motivational and interpersonal.

The major industries providing management careers include healthcare facilities, wholesalers, banks, business service companies, government agencies, insurance companies, retail businesses and schools.

Education requirements for management jobs vary by the company or organization. Some employers require a bachelor degree or an associate degree or some post-secondary education. Some management jobs require a Master in Business Administration (MBA) degree or a master degree in another field.

Related article: What Can I do with a Finance Degree?

TheBestSchools provides you important, reliable information about a wide variety of management careers including salary, employment growth, training, relevant online degrees and much more.

After you read through this page on Management Careers keep browsing our website's extensive career guide for more information on job options, education requirements and salaries.

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Administrative Services Managers

Education and Certifications Administrative Services Managers Need

Although educational requirements for an administrative manager career depend on the organization or business employing them, the minimum requirements include a high school diploma and related work experience. Some businesses require at least a bachelor degree, such as a Bachelor of Business, Bachelor of Engineering, or Bachelor of Facility Management degree.

Administrative service managers may obtain a competency-based professional certification through the International Facility Management Association. The program has two levels: the Facilities Management Professional (FMP) certification and the Certified Facility Manager (CFM) certification. The FMP certification must be obtained first.

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What They Do

Administrative service managers are the jack-of-all-trades for organizations, they plan, direct, coordinate, and follow-up on support services for an organization. In larger companies, the administrative service manager may supervise other support managers, while in smaller companies; the administrative service manager may also function as the business office manager in charge of support services for the entire company.

Administrative management services include a wide array of services. An administrative service manager may do anything from basic administrative tasks such as keeping records, ordering supplies, distributing mail and maintaining facilities, to supervising other administrative personnel and planning budgets for contracts, equipment, and supplies.

An administrative service manager career may include overseeing the maintenance and repair of office machinery, equipment, or electrical and mechanical systems.

An administrative service manager career may include monitoring the business, assuring it meets environmental, health, and security standards and complies with government regulations. An administrative manager career may also include providing recommendations of policy or procedure changes to improve the business' operations.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Advancement opportunities for administrative service managers depend on the size of the organization employing them. Administrative service managers may transfer to different departments, work their way up from a technical position or obtain more responsibility.

A Master of Business Administration degree or an advanced degree in a related field increases career advancement opportunities.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $94,020
2016, Number of Jobs 281,700
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 10%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $163,480
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $52,750

 

Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers

Education and Certifications Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers Need

An advertising, promotions, or marketing manager career typically begins with a bachelor degree. Relevant majors include Bachelor of Marketing or Bachelor of Journalism. A student completing an internship while studying is highly recommended.

Advertising, promotions or marketing managers don't need specific licenses or certifications.

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What They Do

Advertising managers, promotion managers and marketing managers are master fishers of sorts; their primary job is to snare the consumer, hook, line, and sinker before they even know what happened. These managers work together, as well as with art directors, sales agents, and financial staff members to plan programs and campaigns designed to engage current and new customers' interest in a product or service.

Advertising managers, promotion managers and marketing managers all work with various department heads or staff to discuss subjects such as contracts, selection of advertising media, and products to advertise. Together, they decide the type of media to use for the advertising campaign such as radio television, print, online, billboards or a combination of different types of media.

Advertising managers, promotion managers and marketing managers inspect layouts, analyze market research studies, develop pricing strategies for products and supervise a media campaign from start to finish.

An advertising manager career includes stirring up interest in potential buyers for a product or service. An advertising manager career also includes overseeing the sales staff and other individuals responsible for generating advertising ideas. Advertising managers often also serve as a liaison between an advertising or promotion agency developing and placing the ads and the client purchasing the ad campaign.

A marketing manager career involves estimating the demand for a product or service an organization or company offers versus the demand for a similar product or service its competitors offer. Marketing managers also help identify possible additional markets a company can target in advertising.

Marketing manager careers include trying to keep the customers happy with lower prices, while also finding ways to keep the company's costs low to maximize profits.

Promotions managers are responsible for programs combining advertising and purchasing incentives to improve sales.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $129,380
2016, Number of Jobs 249,600
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 10%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $48,150

 

Architectural and Engineering Managers

Education and Certifications Architectural and Engineering Managers Need

Individuals seeking an architectural management career or an engineering management career typically need at least a Bachelor of Engineering degree or a professional degree in architecture. Architectural managers and engineering managers frequently go on to obtain a Masters of Engineering Management (MEM), Masters of Technology Management (MSTM), or a Master of Business Administration degree.

Architectural managers and engineering managers often have a state license; requirements vary by state.

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What They Do

If you hold an interest in architecture or engineering but are also interested in managing people and projects, an architectural manager career or engineering manager career may be the perfect solution for you.

Architectural managers and engineering managers are in charge of research and development teams working on new products, processes, or designs or improving already existing ones.

Both an architectural management career and an engineering management career include creating project budgets, hiring and managing staff, preparing staff training, determining equipment needs, monitoring the building and maintenance of equipment and creating detailed plans for reaching technical goals.

Architectural and engineering managers search for technical problems slowing or stalling a project and create solutions to get the project completed correctly. They may also set administrative policies and procedures.

Both an architectural manager career and an engineering manager career include regularly ensuring the technical accuracy of their staff as well as meeting production deadlines. Architectural managers and engineering managers also regularly meet with other levels of management or professionals, such as financial managers, production managers, marketing managers, contractors and equipment suppliers while working on projects.

Some engineering managers are involved with construction engineering management, industrial engineering management or engineering project management.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $137,720
2016, Number of Jobs 180,100
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 6%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $88,050

 

Compensation and Benefits Managers

Education and Certifications Compensation and Benefits Managers Need

Both a compensation manager career and a benefits manager career typically begin with at least a bachelor's degree, such as a Bachelor of Human Resources, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of Business Management or a degree in a related field such as finance.

Some compensation manager and benefits manager positions require a minimum of a Masters of Human Resources Management, Masters of Finance or a Master of Business Administration (MBA).

Some employers expect a compensation manager to have previous work experience in performing complex financial analysis.

Benefits managers greatly benefit from previous work experience in human resources, finance, or management. They are also expected to have a solid understanding of government regulations and benefits practices.

Compensation managers and benefits managers typically don't need certification; however certification demonstrates mastery of certain skills and professional dedication. The International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans and WorldatWork provide compensation manager certification and benefits manager certification.

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What They Do

Compensation managers and benefits managers directly and largely affect the possibilities for your current and future financial status. A compensation manager career involves planning, directing, and coordinating how much employees are paid. A benefits manager career involves planning, directing and coordinating retirement plans, health insurance and other benefits a company offers its employees.

Compensation managers determine employee's salaries based on market conditions and government regulations, attempting to keep salaries competitive while also not overspending. Compensation managers engage in a lot of data collecting, analyzing, and developing pay scales.

A compensation manager career may involve developing performance plans that award bonuses and incentive pay, as well as determining commission rates and other incentives for employees.

Benefits managers specifically conduct employee benefits programs, including retirement plans and health, life, and disability insurance policies.

A benefits manager career includes managing enrollment, renewal, and distribution processes. A benefits manager career also includes working with a variety of vendors and monitoring government regulations to ensure their programs remain compliant, as well as competitive with others.

In smaller companies, the same individual may hold the responsibilities of both a compensation manager and a benefits manager.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $119,120
2016, Number of Jobs 15,800
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 5%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $202,590
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $68,510

 

Computer and Information Systems Managers

Education and Certifications Computer and Information Systems Managers Need

A computer and information systems manager career typically begins with a Bachelor of Computer Science degree or a Bachelor of Information Science degree. Often, computer and information systems managers also have a graduate degree, such as a Master of Business Administration (MBA).

Most employers also require computer and information systems managers to have years of information technology-related work. The number of years of experience required depends on the level of management and the company's overall size.

Computer and information systems managers don't need a specific license or certification.

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What They Do

Considering that almost every business in the country runs on computer systems, the role of a computer and information systems manager in any given company is arguably as important – if not more so – than the CEO.

Computer and information systems managers, sometimes called information technology managers or IT project managers, are responsible for planning, coordinating, and overseeing all computer-related activities within a company.

A computer and information systems manager career includes evaluating the cost and benefits of a new project in order to justify the expense of a new project to top executives.

An information systems manager career involves determining a company's computer needs and recommending to executives upgrades or new materials. The information technology manager plans and oversees the installing of all new hardware and software.

Information technology managers are responsible for their company's network and electronic documents' security. To remain up-to-date on security options, information systems managers continually study technological advances and determine if and how they can improve security for their company.

An information technology manager career involves working with a variety of people. They oversee other IT professionals, such as computer systems analysts, software developers, information security analysts, and computer support specialists. Information systems managers also negotiate with technology vendors.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Information technology managers traditionally begin their career as a lower level manager and gradually advance within the IT department. They may advance from an IT director or project manager to chief technology officer or chief information officer.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $139,220
2016, Number of Jobs 367,600
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 12%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $83,860

 

Engineering Managers

Education and Certifications Engineering Managers Need

Engineering managers typically have a bachelor's degree in the field of engineering, especially since they need to have years of experience working on complex projects, making important decisions, training and licensing in their own specialty to actually become an engineering manager.

Many managers also have business experience after gaining a Master in Business Administration (MBA) degree or a Master in Engineering Management (MEM) degree before working in the occupation. In addition, many companies pay employees to attain a master's degree in business during employment.

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What They Do

If managing several engineering projects and groups of people in a “systems-thinking” environment sounds like a great job, then, an engineering manager career is in your future. Engineering managers prepare and coordinate activities in engineering as well as development and research. Communication skills are essential in this line of work as well as flexibility, leadership and time management skills.

Engineering managers wear many hats that include organizing and integrating sizable projects that could rival the work of a small army.

A project engineering manager career includes organizing and directing the design of various machinery and equipment and formulating specific plans to reach certain engineering goals.

An engineering manager career includes managing the teams involved in the project, reviewing and approving any project changes or revisions, interpreting blueprints and schematics and overseeing the technical details of work.

A project engineering manager consults with other areas and levels of management, hires and supervises employees, organizes and proposes budget costs, manages contracts as well as decides all equipment needs.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $137,720
2016, Number of Jobs 180,100
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 6%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $88,050

 

Farmers, Ranchers and Other Agricultural Managers

Education and Certifications Farmers, Ranchers and Other Agricultural Managers Need

Typically, farmers, ranchers and other agricultural managers acquire skills through on-the-job training or government sponsored training and have at least a high school diploma.

Increasingly farmers, ranchers and other agricultural managers have a Bachelor in Agriculture degree, a Bachelor in Agribusiness degree, a Bachelor in Soil and Crop Management degree or a Bachelor in Agricultural Systems Management degree or in a related field as farming equipment and land management has increased in complexity.

Some schools offer an Associate in Agriculture Production Technology degree.

Students attending an agricultural college learn about crops and growing conditions. Conversely, ranchers and dairy farmers learn the fundamentals of veterinary science.

Farmers, ranchers, and agricultural managers typically gain experience under seasoned farmers and often get federal assistance with programs such as Beginner Farmer and the Rancher Competitive Grants Program.

Certification is not mandatory, however, some farmers acquire the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers certificate to demonstrate greater competency in agricultural management.

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What They Do

If you appreciate organic foods, working with your hands, growing and harvesting crops and you love animals and enjoy the outdoors, consider a career as a farmer, rancher, or as another type of agricultural manager. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers operate farms, greenhouses and other agricultural establishments that plant and harvest crops as well as produce livestock and dairy products.

A day in the life of a farmer, rancher and other agricultural manager is a very physically demanding job that starts before the sun rises and ends long after the sun goes down. Their day includes a variety of farming activities from supervising crop production and planting to harvesting and herding livestock, spending countless hours studying market conditions to evaluating how to produce crops and raise livestock.

A farmer, rancher or agricultural manager career may include monitoring potentially available federal funding, buying and organizing farm machinery and other supplies, repairing farm equipment and adapting to changing weather and crop conditions. A farmer, rancher or agricultural manager career may also include monitoring all budgets, financial records and staff members.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $69,620
2016, Number of Jobs 1,028,700
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 -1%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $135,900
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $35,360

 

Financial Managers

Education and Certifications Financial Managers Need

Typically people seeking a financial manager career need a bachelor's degree in finance, economics, business administration or accounting and at least five years experience in financial areas such as accounting or financial analyst. However, employers increasingly seek candidates with a master's degree in finance, business administration or economics, as well as a deeper knowledge in areas such as financial analysis.

Though not necessary, financial managers may attain a Chartered Financial Analyst certification (CFA) certification through the CFA Institute. In order to receive the CFA certification, financial managers must have a bachelor's degree, four years of relevant employment experience, and pass three exams.

The Association for Financial Professionals provides investment professionals certification through the Association for Financial Professionals as long as they pass a computer-based exam and have two years of work experience.

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What They Do

If helping an organization achieve its financial goals and assisting them in building a business or institution that makes a difference, then a financial planning manager career may be in your future. Financial managers coordinate financial plans and strategies to help direct and maintain the overall health of a specific company or organization.

A typical day for a financial services manager consists of preparing financial reports and projections, overseeing any legal financial issues, devising ways to reduce expenses and maximize profits and analyzing financial reports and data.

A financial management career involves supervising employees and assisting management in decisions. A financial management career also involves reviewing any expansion or acquisition opportunities.

Financial management careers typically involve working in teams and performing duties specific to an industry. Financial managers working in the lending business learn lending processes and criteria as well as lending laws and regulations. Financial managers work in many different areas of management such as consumer loans, credit departments, insurance and risk analysis.

Career Advancement Opportunities

With hard work, dedication and extensive experience in day-to-day business operations within their respective departments, financial managers advance in their career to a higher management position or begin their own consulting firm.

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Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $125,080
2016, Number of Jobs 580,400
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 19%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $66,480

 

Food Service Managers

Education and Certifications Food Service Managers Need

Individuals typically do not need a college degree to begin a food service management career. However, increasingly employers seek candidates with some postsecondary education and training. Many food service management companies and national restaurant chains recruit at college hospitality and food management programs. Technical schools and community colleges provide training for individuals interested in a food service manager career.

Most certification and degree programs offer work-study training as well as classes in areas such as nutrition and food preparation, business management and computer science. In addition, restaurant chains and food management companies, such as healthcare food service management, offer intensive training programs. These programs include food preparation, nutrition, employee management and education on company procedures.

Food services managers don't need certification; however the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation offers the Foodservice Management Professional (FMP) certificate to recognize outstanding professional service of food service managers.

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What They Do

If you enjoy restaurant management, customer interaction, and the food services industry, then food service management may be in your future. A food services manager wears many hats; they ensure customers are satisfied, oversee daily restaurant operations and occasionally serve food and drinks to patrons.

A food service manager career involves reviewing daily food and beverage inventory, restaurant equipment and supplies and overseeing culinary preparation and meal quantity. A food service manager career also includes complying with all health codes as well as employee and food safety.

Food services managers hire and fire employees and make sure employees receive training. A food services manager career also involves finding resolutions for any customer complaints, designing and planning employee schedules and duties and reviewing all payroll, budget and financial transactions. Professionals in food service management also design and implement employee performance and patron service standards.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $52,030
2016, Number of Jobs 308,700
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 9%
Entry-Level Education Requirements High School Diploma or Equivalent
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $90,290
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $29,850

 

Human Resources Managers

Education and Certifications Human Resources Managers Need

Human resources managers typically need a Bachelor in Human Resources or a Bachelor in Business Administration to begin a human resources management career.

People can obtain some human resources jobs with experience in other backgrounds such as business management and information technology.

For some HR positions some companies require a Master in Human Resources degree or a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. In addition, human resources personnel interested in HR management positions usually need experience working with human resources programs such as employment laws and compensation plans.

Some colleges and universities offer an MBA with a concentration in Human Resources Management, a Master in Human Resources Management – functional Human Resource Management

Although certification is not mandatory, many employers prefer hiring certified human resources managers. Certification also aids with human resources manager career advancement opportunities. The Society for Human Resource Management offers many human resources programs.

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What They Do

If organizing and directing several administrative functions at once and serving as a primary liaison between employers and company management sounds interesting, a human resources management career is in your future.

Human resources managers also known as HR managers coordinate the administrative functions of an organization such as hiring and recruitment of personnel as well. A human resources management career includes meeting with company executives on strategic planning.

A human resources management career consists of coordinating an organization's staff in order to best utilize employees' skills; serving as a link between company management and employees and handling all matters related to company questions, employee services and work-related issues.

An HR management career includes educating executives on company policies, such as equal employment laws and sexual harassment and coordinating hiring processes.

Human resources managers are involved with recruitment events and interviews, mediating work issues, handling disciplinary procedures and firing personnel.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $110,120
2016, Number of Jobs 136,100
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 9%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $197,720
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $65,040

 

Industrial Production Managers

Education and Certifications Industrial Production Managers Need

Typically, people interested in an industrial production manager career need to have a bachelor's degree in an area such as business administration and two to five years of work experience to begin working in management.

Occasionally, workers with many years of experience, as well as education in management programs obtain an industrial production manager position. A Master of Business Administration (MBA) or a similar graduate degree also helps personnel to advance into industrial production management.

After college or graduate school, some industrial production managers begin training programs that teach different areas of the production process before working their way up to actual management. Others work in accounting or purchasing to take less time to attain a managerial position.

Although not mandatory, industrial production managers can obtain certifications through organizations such as The Association for Operational Management (AOM) and the American Society of Quality (ASQ). The AOM offers certification in production management; the ASQ offers certification in quality control.

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What They Do

Manufacturing plants keep America working and moving. If the idea of playing a key role in organizing manufacturing operations, monitoring the production of goods from cars to computer equipment and contributing to economic growth sounds interesting, then an industrial production manager career is in your future.

Industrial production managers direct and oversee the daily operations of manufacturing plants and organizations. More specifically, a typical day for an industrial production manager consists of discovering and implementing specific ways to make sure the plant employees, production processes and equipment function efficiently and effectively.

An industrial production manager career includes monitoring production data to ensure manufacturing processes stay on schedule and within budget.

An industrial production management career includes hiring, training and evaluating employees, preparing personnel records and analyzing reports, and evaluating worker safety and performance.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $100,580
2016, Number of Jobs 170,600
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 -1%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $168,780
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $61,360

 

Legislators

Education and Certifications Legislators Need

Typically, people interested in a legislator career, need a bachelor's degree or higher to effectively compete in an election. However, there is no formal education requirement to actually become a legislator. Candidates come from a wide range of occupational backgrounds, experience and educational degrees, but many have direct experience in politics or management.

Legislators, elected officials, campaign for a position in the government whether local, state or federal. Campaigning, a grueling task filled with long hours of public appearances, also requires significant campaign fundraising.

Graduate degrees in law and business as well as a Master degree in Public Administration are particularly helpful when running for state legislator or federal legislator positions.

Many candidates also have strong backgrounds in education, law, and business as well as extensive volunteer experience working with charities, religious affiliations and on other political campaigns. In addition, legislators often begin their career on a local level and gain experience before seeking a higher office.

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What They Do

People who care about how laws impact communities, have the patience to truly listen to people, can compromise on many issues and enjoy making new laws and changing existing ones may find a legislator career highly rewarding. Simply put, legislators, elected members of the legislative branch of government, develop and enact laws and statutes for local, state and federal governments. However, when reviewing the overall job description, a legislator career is much more detailed and complex.

A legislator career involves spending days developing and drafting laws for other legislators to pass, debating and understanding proposed laws during floor sessions, writing and approving budgets and regulations and finding money for programs in their districts.

A legislator career involves voting on bills and enacting them into law, hearing concerns and testimony from political leaders as well as the communities they represent and serving on several panels and committees for policy issues.

The term legislator includes a wide variety of politicians from members of the U.S. Congress and state senators to township commissioners and council members.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $25,630
2016, Number of Jobs 55,500
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 7%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $97,510
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $17,480

 

Lodging Managers

Education and Certifications Lodging Managers Need

Typically, people interested in a lodging manager career need a high school diploma and many years of experience working in a hotel or in a relevant setting.

Some smaller lodging establishments require applicants to hold an Associate in Hospitality Management degree or an Associate degree in Business Administration with an emphasis in Food & Hotel Management or some kind of certificate in hospitality management.

Technical, trade and vocational programs offer certificates in hospitality management.

Most full-service hotels require hotel managers to have a Bachelor in Hospitality Management degree, a Bachelor in Business Administration with a Hospitality & Tourism Management Concentration or a Bachelor in Business Administration degree and significant computer knowledge due to advanced computer systems managing many house keeping, food services and reservation operations.

Some colleges and universities offer an MBA with a Hospitality & Tourism Management Concentration.

The Accreditation Commission for Programs in Hospitality Administration provides accreditation for most hospitality management certificates. Many technical high schools offer a two-year program which educates students interested in hotel management careers. The program leads to a professional certification created by the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute.

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What They Do

If customer service, coordinating all aspects of the hospitality industry and working in a demanding and fast-paced environment sounds like a great job, then consider a lodging manager career. Lodging managers ensure guests have a great experience. A lodging management career includes directing, planning and coordinating all lodging activities.

A typical day for a hotel manager includes overseeing guest services and rooms, inspecting all hotel areas for thorough sanitation, welcoming and checking-in guests, and managing all aspects of housekeeping and food quality.

A hotel management career includes tracking all financial aspects of the lodging facility and making sure every lodging detail is up to codes and standards.

A hotel management career includes monitoring employee performance as well as interviewing, training and hiring staff. A hotel manager also resolves all front office and patron issues as well as establishes room rates, monitors all budgets and approves expenses.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Most full-service hotels offer better opportunities for lodging managers than smaller hotel chains. Some career opportunities range from advancing from an assistant manager to manager or from managing a single hotel to becoming a regional manager for multiple chain locations. However, these advancements can involve relocating to a different town, city or state.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $51,800
2016, Number of Jobs 47,800
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 4%
Entry-Level Education Requirements High School Diploma or Equivalent
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $98,370
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $28,930

 

Management Analysts

Education and Certifications Management Analysts Need

A variety of bachelor degrees appropriately apply to entry-level management analyst positions, such as a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, a Bachelor of Science in Management, or a Bachelor of Science in Finance.

Increasingly, employers seek management analysts with a Masters in Business Administration (MBA) degree, a Master in Finance degree or a Master of Accounting degree.

Management analysts stay up-to-date on their field through regularly attending conferences.

Although certification is not required for management analysts, certification demonstrates experience in the field and provides an upper hand when job seeking. The Certified Management Consultant (CMC) title is available through The Institute of Management Consultants USA, Inc.

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What They Do

Management analysts take a good company and make it better through cutting costs and improving efficiency, which ultimately increases revenue – everyone wins!

Management analysts work is the sleuthing of the business world, as management analysts gather and study as much information surrounding a problem as possible, interview personnel, and physically visit the location of the problem before determining ways to improve efficiency. A management analyst career includes gathering and studying information such as financial data related to revenue and spending, as well as employment reports. Also, a management analyst career sometimes includes building mathematical models to solve problems.

Depending on the problem, management analysts may work alone or with a team of analysts and consultants, each specializing in a different area.

Once a solution is decided upon – whether it is a new system, different procedure, or changes in organization – management analysts provide solutions to the company management team either through a presentation or written document.

Many businesses hire management analysts contractually for a specific job at a time, however some management analysts work for a company on a full-time basis. Management analysts working contractually must prepare and submit detailed bids to potential employers.

Common specialized areas for management analysts include: inventory management, reorganizing corporate structures, healthcare, telecommunications, or specific government agencies.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Management analysts at the senior level may have extended responsibility for supervising teams working on larger projects, as well as the important task of seeking out new clientele. Some management analysts become a partner in their consulting organization.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $82,450
2016, Number of Jobs 806,400
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 14%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $152,210
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $47,140

 

Medical and Health Services Managers

Education and Certifications Medical and Health Services Managers Need

Typically, people interested in a medical services manager career or a health services manager career need at least a Bachelor in Health Administration degree and a license. Some hospital and healthcare employers prefer a Master in Health Administration degree or a Master of Health Care Administration degree. For some positions a Master in Public Administration degree may suffice.

Many college programs give student interested in a medical services management career or health services management career specializations to choose from.

Some colleges and universities offer a MBA in Healthcare Administration degree or an MBA in Health Services degree.

Paths can range from hospitals and nursing care centers to mental health facilities and physician's offices. Some employers allow only on-the-job training instead of a formal college education for a medical services manager job.

All medical services managers need a license and each state has its own set of regulations and standards for different areas of health services management.

Find the best school for you:
The 30 Best Online Bachelor's in Healthcare Administration Degree Programs
The 25 Best Online Master's of Healthcare Administration Degree Programs
The 25 Best Online MBA in Healthcare Management Degree Programs

What They Do

If you enjoy managing, directing and motivating others, have an interest in the medical field and health administration, and want to make a difference in the lives of patients; a career in health care management is in your future.

Medical services managers and health services managers organize and coordinate health and medical services in nursing homes, hospitals and other managed healthcare agencies, offices and clinics.

Both a medical services manager career and a health services manager career include delivering quality healthcare services and monitoring, adapting to and making sure staff members comply with the ever-changing laws, regulations and technology.

Both a medical services management career and a health services management career include overseeing assistant administrators, managing all facility finances and working with medical staff and department head members on all service needs and adjustments.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Advancement in medical services management careers and health services management careers usually involve moving into higher levels and larger paying positions. Many college graduates start their careers as assistants and move their way up to health services managers. With many years of experience, managers can advance to consultants or professors of healthcare management.

A master's degree in healthcare management increases the chances of gaining a higher-level management job.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $98,350
2016, Number of Jobs 72,100
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 20%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $176,130
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $58,350

 

Natural Sciences Managers

Education and Certifications Natural Sciences Managers Need

After several years of experience and training on research teams, scientists can advance in their career to natural sciences manager positions. Natural sciences managers typically have a bachelor's or higher-level degree such as a masters or doctorate in a scientific discipline or a related field. A Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is also helpful when looking to advance into a general scientific management career.

A solid background in scientific and technical training is paramount for professionals seeking a natural sciences manager career. Natural sciences managers need to understand all of the work their staff provides in order to provide training and assistance when necessary.

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The 50 Best Chemistry Programs in the World Today
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What They Do

Ever wonder who manages large scientific expeditions into the Alaskan wild to research global warming trends? Or who coordinates research and development of leading edge cancer research? A natural sciences manager is the leader of these extremely rewarding and demanding projects; they plan and supervise research, production and testing activities for teams of physicists, chemists and scientists.

Natural sciences manager careers involve working with teams of high-level executives to develop specific scientific goals in carrying out major research and development projects.

A natural sciences management career includes organizing budgets and deciding all equipment, training and employee requirements, reviewing the goals of the project and making sure all staff members are using sound testing methods and providing accurate information.

A natural science management career involves preparing reports, hiring and evaluating scientific staff, establishing scientific protocols and procedures and reporting research findings to top level executives.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $118,970
2016, Number of Jobs 56,700
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 10%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $62,080

 

Post-secondary Education Administrators

Education and Certifications Post-secondary Education Administrators Need

Most postsecondary education administrator positions require at least a master's degree from a variety of fields, including social work, accounting, or marketing. Postsecondary education administrators seeking a high-level position typically need a Ph.D. either in higher education or perhaps, if they were previously a professor, in the subject they taught.

Although no specific certifications or licenses are required for postsecondary education administrators, many employers – particularly in the registrar's office – require work experience.

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What They Do

Postsecondary education administrators have a monumental job of keeping colleges and universities running smoothly through overseeing student services, academics, and research. They generally work in one specific area of a college, thus job responsibilities may vary.

Postsecondary education administrators working in admissions determine which students receive acceptance. They typically travel to specific areas of the country and speak with high school counselors and students about their college, urging qualified students to apply.

Postsecondary education administrator careers include determining how many available spots there are for admission, meeting with prospective students and answering their questions about the school.

A postsecondary education administrator career may include reviewing all applications in a process deciding who receives admission letters. A postsecondary education administrator career may also include preparing the promotional materials for new and prospective students and frequently working with the financial aid department.

A higher education administrator working in the registrar's office maintains student and course records. These administrators have a great deal of student interaction, as they schedule and register students for classes, help students ensure they are meeting, or on track to meet graduation requirements.

A higher education administrator career may include preparing the students' transcripts and diplomas. Postsecondary education administrators in the registrar office also plan the commencement ceremonies.

Postsecondary education administrators working in the student affairs department create and oversee multiple different nonacademic school functions, such as student athletics, activities, and multicultural affairs. Students often visit the student's affairs offices for advice on issues such as housing issues, personal issues, or academic issues. A Postsecondary education administrator in the student's affairs office also creates and maintains student records.

Some postsecondary education administrators are called provosts and work with college presidents, helping them develop academic policies. Provosts may also have a part in making faculty appointments, tenure decisions, and managing budgets.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Higher education administrators may move up within their department of college, while some obtain a college president position.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $92,360
2016, Number of Jobs 180,100
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 10%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $182,150
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $52,960

 

Preschool and Childcare Center Directors

Education and Certifications Preschool and Childcare Center Directors Need

Minimum education requirements for people seeking a preschool director or childcare center director career vary by state from a high school diploma to an associate degree to a Bachelor of Early Childhood Education degree. Some states also require preschool directors and childcare center directors to have work experience in early childhood education.

In some states preschool directors and childcare center directors need a nationally recognized certification.

Many states require the Child Development Associate (CDA) certification offered through the Council for Professional Recognition. Some states also recognize the Child Care Professional (CCP) designation through the Nation Early Childhood Program Accreditation.

Preschool directors and childcare center directors need a license.

Find the best school for you: The Best Online Early Childhood Education Bachelor's Degree Programs

What They Do

Preschool directors and childcare center directors rarely have a down or dull moment; not only are they working directly with a group of children on a daily basis, but they also oversee a staff and daily activities, plan lessons and activities, and they're involved with the budget.

Preschool directors and childcare center directors have a large leadership role with their staff. Both a preschool director career and a childcare center director career involve hiring staff members and providing training as well as professional development opportunities for staff members.

Preschool director careers and childcare center director careers also involve developing all program policies for staff to follow.

When conflicts arise between children, a preschool director or a childcare center director often assist a staff member in appropriately dealing with the children; the director usually contact parents and explains the situation. Directors also regularly speak with parents about the overall progress of their children.

A preschool director career and a childcare center director career include ensuring the facility they manage is clean, safe, and meets state regulations. They are also responsible for either developing the curriculum or program, if they work for an independent facility, or if the facility is part of a larger chain, ensuring they meet the standards of the parent organization.

If the preschool or childcare center receives state and federal funding, the director must ensure the programs meet state and federal guidelines.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $46,890
2016, Number of Jobs 61,800
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 11%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $85,240
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $29,980

 

Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers

Education and Certifications Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers Need

A property management career, real estate management career, or community association management career may technically begin with a high school diploma, although it's not uncommon for these managers to obtain vocational training or a Bachelor or Master of Business Administration, Accounting, Finance, Real Estate Management, or Public Administration. Additional education helps for job seeking. All positions require knowledge of property management.

Real estate managers buying or selling property, need a license from the state they practice in. Some states require property association managers to obtain licensure.

Managers of public housing, subsidized by the federal government, need certification.

Many property managers, real estate managers and community association managers voluntarily earn certification in order to obtain an edge when job seeking.

It's common for employers to require property managers, real estate managers, and community association managers to attend formal training programs from professional and trade real estate association.

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What They Do

When it's time to rent property, whether it's for your home or business, there is one person you depend heavily on to guide you – the property manager, real estate manager, or community association manager (depending on the type of property you're looking at).

The property manager, real estate manager, or community association manager oversees the property and ensures it presents itself well. These manager careers include overseeing the daily operations and preserving or improving properties' resale value. These manager careers also include regularly meeting with prospective renters, answering questions about the property and explaining the lease and terms of occupancy.

If the renters chose to move forward, the property, real estate or community association manager collects their monthly fees, including rent, mortgage, taxes, insurance, payroll, and cleaning fees. These manager careers also include contracting for garbage removal, landscaping, security, and other services.

The manager is the renter's point of contact if any issues within the property come up, such as broken equipment, violations or complaints about disturbances.

Property managers, real estate managers, and community association managers must regularly inspect the property, keep records of all rental activity, prepare budgets and financial reports, and keep up on – and adhere to – laws related to their industry, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Federal Fair Housing Amendment Act, and local fair housing laws.

A property manager career and a real estate manager career include overseeing operations of income-producing commercial or residential properties. A community association manager career includes overseeing properties such as condominiums, cooperatives, and planned communities through homeowner or community associations.

Career Advancement Opportunities

Some property managers begin as assistants and work their way up to a property manager position.

Over time, property managers, real estate managers, and community association managers may manage more and larger properties.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $58,670
2016, Number of Jobs 317,300
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 10%
Entry-Level Education Requirements High School Diploma or Equivalent
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $128,630
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $29,500

 

Public Relations Managers and Specialists

Education and Certifications Public Relations Managers and Specialists Need

A public relations manager career or public relations specialist career begins with a earning a Bachelor of Public Relations, Journalism, Communications, English, or Business. Some employers specify a preference for candidates with a Master of Public Relations or Master of Journalism degree.

Public relations specialists usually receive on-the-job training, which may last from one month to one year. People initiating a public relations career typically begin with simple tasks and gradually, with experience, write news releases, speeches and carry out public relations programs.

Public relations managers may earn a professional certification, called the Accredited Business Communicator credential, through the Public Relations Society of America or through the International Association of Business Communicators.

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What They Do

Public relations specialists and public relations managers have a huge weight on their shoulders – the weight of their employer's public face and reputation. Public relations specialists and public relations managers are expected to regularly interact and communicate with the public, maintaining a favorable image for their employer.

The community interactions of public relations specialists and public relations managers include writing media releases, contacting specific media outlets to publish the releases, planning and directing public relations programs, raising funds for their organizations, and sometimes providing or arranging interviews. Raising funds for an organization may include contacting potential donors and applying for grants.

Public relations specialists and public relations managers not only maintain a positive image of their employer, but they help design, develop, and implement a specific corporate image, identity, and brand through events, logos, signs, and other advertisements. In order to best develop a brand and identity for a company, the public relations specialists and public relations managers must first identify main client groups and audiences, researching them in order to cater to their preferences.

A public relations manager career includes closely observing public trends and interests and finding ways to connect those trends to their employer in order to keep the employer relevant and in a favorable light with the public. A public relations manager career sometimes includes working with top executives in drafting speeches, arranging interviews, and writing company newsletters.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $59,300
2016, Number of Jobs 259,600
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 9%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $112,260
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $32,840

 

Sales Managers

Education and Certifications Sales Managers Need

Generally, employers seek candidates with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree with an emphasis in marketing, although some employers prefer candidates with a master's degree. Some schools offer a Bachelor in Business Administration with an emphasis in Sales Management degree or a Bachelor of Business Administration in Sales & Marketing Management degree.

Significant sales representative work experience is extremely beneficial to sales managers and can sometimes replace missing education credentials. Most employers seek sales managers with one to five years of work experience.

Sales managers don't need specific certifications or licenses.

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What They Do

A sales manager career is not for the weak-willed or those only partially dedicated to their job. Sales managers endure a massive amount of responsibility, ranging from setting sales goals and analyzing data to developing training programs for sales representatives and directing entire sales teams.

Sales managers need good communications skills, as they not only manage large teams of sales representatives and regional sales managers, but they also speak directly with elevated customer complaints about sales and service. A sales management career includes overseeing training programs for sales staff.

Sales managers work with numbers, as they also spend a significant amount of time preparing and approving budgets and expenditures, analyzing sales statistics, projecting sales, planning special pricing plans, and determining discount rates. A sales manager career also includes studying customer preferences and using the results to help plan sales efforts.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $121,060
2016, Number of Jobs 385,500
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 7%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $57,590

 

Social and Community Service Managers

Education and Certifications Social and Community Service Managers Need

The minimum education to begin a social service manager career or a community service manager career is a Bachelor of Social Work, Urban Studies, Public Administration, or a degree in a related field. However, many employers prefer a social service manager or a community service manager with a Master of Social Work degree or a degree in a similar field such as public or business administration or public health.

Social service managers and community service managers do not need specific certifications or licenses.

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What They Do

Social service managers and community service managers put together and oversee programs that offer a variety of services to the public.

Social service managers and community service managers regularly interact and listen to the public, learning what programs and types of services are needed and desired. It is up to the social service managers and community service managers to then develop programs to meet those needs and hire and train staff members to run the program.

Social service managers and community service managers ensure their program receives funding, which may involve fundraising. Both a social service manager career and a community service manager career include finding ways of collecting data on their programs to analyze the effectiveness of it.

In large companies, social service managers and community service managers have more narrowed responsibilities and usually follow guidelines. They're involved with programs designed by someone higher in the organization. In smaller companies, however, social service managers and community service managers often wear multiple hats and have a more public face through speaking engagements, fundraising, and meeting with potential donors.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $64,100
2016, Number of Jobs 147,300
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 18%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $39,730
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $109,990

 

Top Executives

Education and Certifications Top Executives Need

The education requirements for a top executive may vary depending on the company size and industry, but most top executives have at least a four-year degree, such as a Bachelor of Business Administration or a degree related to the field of their company's industry.

Top executives in education, such as college presidents and school superintendents, typically have a Doctorate of Education Administration or a Doctorate in the field they originally taught in. Top executives in the public sector often have a bachelor or Master of Business Administration, Public Administration, Law, or the liberal arts. Top executives for large companies most commonly have a Master of Business Administration (MBA).

Professionals seeking a top executive career typically need extensive work experience in their company's industry.

Top executives may obtain a voluntary certification, known as the Certified Manager (CM) credential, through the Institute of Certified Professional Managers. Certification may help with job competition and career advancement opportunities.

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See also: What Can I do with a Finance Degree?

What They Do

If having the entire weight of a company's success on your shoulders makes you smile at the challenge rather than break out in a cold sweat, you may be cut out for a top executive career. Top executives are responsible for organizing all operational activities of their company and ensuring their company meets its goals.

Top executive careers involve determining and setting goals for each department in a company, establishing policies and procedures, and monitoring activities regularly to ensure each department is moving toward its goal appropriately. Top executive careers also involve regularly communicating with other executives, staff members and board members about general and daily operations.

Top executives generally appoint department heads and managers, as well as negotiate or approve their contracts.

Finances are large part of top executives' focus, as they oversee their company's financial and budgetary activities. This includes analyzing financial statements, sales reports, and other performance indicators, as well as finding additional places to cut costs but still improve performance.

The responsibilities of a top executive also depend on the size of the company. In smaller companies, a top executive may have a hand in nearly every department. In a larger company, however, the top executive generally focuses more on policy making and strategic planning.

Career Advancement Opportunities

General managers can sometimes advance to higher-level management or executive positions. Professionals seeking a top executive career frequently begin as a lower-level manager and gradually advance within their own firm.

Obtaining certifications, attending training programs, and attending executive development programs all help the chances of advancement to a top executive career.

Essential Career Information

2017 Median Pay $104,700
2016, Number of Jobs 2,572,000
Employment Growth Forecast, 2016-2026 8%
Entry-Level Education Requirements Bachelor's Degree
2017, Wage of the Highest 10% $208,000
2017, Wage of the Lowest 10% $68,110

* Salary, number of jobs and employment growth provided by
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